Tag Archives: Linden sweatshirt

Oh go on then! I’ll have a floral Linden this time….

Oh people I have had some mega sewing going on this last week, but because I was also hugely busy work wise I am a bit behind with my writing – & I have so much to write about!   I have to start with the simplest as some downtime calls (& I’m watching something with subtitles at the moment which means no multi tasking!) So here we go on the next episode of my causal wardrobe, suitable for warehouse work (maybe rather posh for warehouse work in all honesty but I’ll do it anyway) & also for general mooching around looking rather groovy.

Linden sweatshirt

Yes, my attraction to the Linden sweatshirt continues, not having resolved the pocket issues from the green one, but having worn the grey one * very much indeed*, may I present the newest addition to the Linden sweatshirt stable?

This fabric is from the Fabric Godmother (& was provided for me to review)- the floral is a rose pique jersey in blue  (there are two other colourways- pink & purple) & the solid navy is a gorgeous Milano jersey, stretchier than a ponte, thicker than your usual t-shirt weight with something *very* cosy about it, without it being too thick.  I am smitten with it to be honest, & am already thinking of some navy Hudsons – it would be perfect …. just like it is for the sleeves, cuffs & bands for this Linden sweatshirt.

Linden sweatshirt

Don’t you just love the two-tone raglan sleeve top effect?  I love raglan sleeves anyway, but it’s times like these when two fabrics pair so wonderfully that the raglan comes into its own.  I may have been swooning over the navy Milano jersey, but let’s face it, the rose pique jersey is the star.  It works so well in its pattern – bring on the flowers I say!  Sweatshirts can be pretty too!

Linden sweatshirt I ‘ve made this a few times now & it’s a 100% overlocker make – I think it took me about an hour to sew….

Linden sweatshirt

So many photos! That’s because I LOVE this sweatshirt. I’m so thrilled to have made something that is eminently functional but pretty. But I’ve also taken a few extra to show you  a new part of my cottage  – surreptitiously.  This is the upstairs hallway.  To the left is the bathroom & straight ahead is my bedroom.  It has loads of olde features – including these doors with latchy handles (note technical olde worlde terminology).  The camera in in the doorway of the back bedroom (aka sewing room/ office) & both bedrooms are on a higher level than the hallway & bathroom.  Nice step up to both.

Linden sweatshirt To my right are the open plan stairs.  There are a few nooks & crannies including the recess to my left which is a nice little presentation space….

There ends the guided tour of the only non room in my cottage.  Just because you might be curious.  I will bring you other backdrops as time progresses!  And who knows, maybe even more Linden sweatshirts!!!

In the meantime have a very good week & I’ll be back soon with some more – I have a couple more tops to show, some trousers using my block pattern & then a special posh frock that I wore to a bit of a do in London last week…

Disclaimer, the fabric was provided to me free of charge for me to review.  All views are my own.

Linden Sweatshirt x2 or just because you can sew welt pockets doesn’t mean you should ….

Before I share a couple of Linden Sweatshirts, I’d like to thank you all for the suggestions about what to do with my boiled wool in the last post.  I will check out all the ideas you’ve left – I knew you wouldn’t let me down!  There are a few ideas for Schnittchen patterns – coatigans/ jackets which are intriguing – never sewn any of these before.  You can bet I’ll keep you posted …

But today I’ve some Linden sweatshirts to show you that I made up this week.  After deciding to upgrade my ‘test Linden sweatshirt’ & putting it in writing to the world the other day, I sprung into action & cut two out.  The first was in the green sweatshirting that I had set aside, an eBay purchase along with the ribbing from Plush Addict.  The second was a lucky extra – I had enough of some lightweight grey marl sweater knit that I had left over after making a cardigan, Simplicity 2154 .

Linden grey marl

But there wasn’t enough to make any of the neck, hem or cuff bands out of the grey so I had to pick some contrast ribbing- also from Plush Addict – & I am so glad I was forced along this route as I am immensely pleased with this particular Linden – I love the way the lighter weight fabric allows a bit of drape & it totally suits the wider neckline.

Linden grey marl (2)

And the pop of turquoise knit rib gives it a definite edge that a plain grey Linden sweatshirt would not have.  I have worn this a couple of days (in the warehouse job with jeans) & oops I see a bit of a smudge on it, so it is now in the wash.  My pink skirt (A Tilly and the Buttons Airielle)  is also victim of tending a woodfire but only revealed to me in these photos.  At least I am living up to my ‘scruffy’ name….

Linden grey marl (3)

As usual I ramble and am talking about the results before the process.  This is OK for the grey sweatshirt because what else do you need to know?  It has worked out better than I hoped & was a great sew.  But I have made more than one, on the same day, but this other is controversial….and I haven’t made my mind up about it yet, and as a result have not worn it outside yet….

Linden with pocketsYes it has pocketses.  Welt pockets.  And I conjured up this plan whilst cutting out.  But here’s the thang.  I do not think it works as a wearable item of clothing.  Isn’t it a bit ….. crafty?  Is it a classic case of ‘just because you can add welt pockets to a sweatshirt, it doesn’t mean that you should …’??

Linden with pockets (2)The cosy side of the fleece (sweatshirting’s wrong side) hosts my hands as the pocket inners.  But that is not the reason I created welt pockets.  The idea was to have a safe place to carry my phone when working in the warehouse (I’ve a new phone & want to look after it y’see).

Linden with pockets (3)Keeps it safe, is just the right size (bigger than an iPhone) & means I can access music on the go too.

Linden with pockets (4)But just because I can sew welt pockets doesn’t mean it’s right.  Is it the contrast ribbing? I am tempted to unpick the lower front half of the sweatshirt and add a kind of ‘kangaroo’ pocket on top of the welt pockets, hiding the original pockets under a more anonymous generic self-fabric pocket, whilst allowing the original pockets to function.  With side hand entry.  What do you think?

What’s funny is that I was so confident in this design detail that I even took photos of the steps along the way to add welt pockets.   I drafted them myself & referred to the instructions in the Colette Patterns Anise jacket to guide me.  I am not going to waste the photos, but share them with a touch of caution – use this wisely and don’t end up in the same dilemma I am in.  Remember the mantra & repeat after me- ‘Just because you can sew welt pockets, it doesn’t mean that it’s the right thing to do’

I’m going to note the steps I took – but please don’t treat this as a definitive guide for sewing welt pockets – there are plenty of others about with all of the steps clearly illustrated.  (OMG this tutorial from Workroom Social is just so incredibly neat & clear showing a single stage welt pocket – not separately pieced welts)  This tutorial on Craftsy uses a similar approach that I have taken.  However if you have done a few welts in your time, mine below might serve as an aide memoir … as that is what it will be for me…

So first of all I marked the horizontal placement of the welts pockets, referring to the size of my phone as a guide.  Going forward you might want to draw on stitching lines – above & below these horizontal lines.  Tip – Stitching lines on a single welt are less critical than for bound buttonholes which is like a double welt with two welt pieces that need to meet nicely in the middle.  Single welts do not need to meet anything else – it’s just about how deep you want your welt to be.  So relax a bit.  I did.  My stitching lines were about 1/2″ either side of the original horizontal line.

Linden pockets 1I then cut the welts so that they were longer than the horizontal welt lines (to provide a good seam allowance) & width was calculated by doubling the finished welt depth & adding seam allowances x2.   (But more on welt depth/ width calculations below). I interfaced each welt.

Linden pockets 2

And then I cut pocket bags about the same width as the ribbing welt’s long measurement.   Have a play with the folded pocket bag to make sure it doesn’t poke out underneath your hem!  Adjust if necessary.

Linden pockets 3Next, make the welts – fold in half right sides together and sew each of the short ends.  Turn right sides out and press & baste the open long edges together.

Placing the welts to attach to the sweatshirt requires a bit of thought- the welts are sewn at the lower stitching line (upside down) & because I was feeling relaxed about the precise size of the finished welt, I placed the raw edge alongside the original horizontal pocket line.  However, if you are more specific about the finished depth of the welt, you need to make sure that the depth of the stitched folded welt is equal to the desired finished welt depth plus the distance between original horizontal pocket line & stitching line on the sweatshirt front.  I would trim the welt to this depth before I attached it so that I could place the raw cut edge against the original horizontal stitching line.  I would also transfer the stitching line to the top of the welt to make sure I sewed along the right line.  (Does that make sense?)

Linden pockets 4Now onto the pocket bags.  They are attached ‘upside down’  to the stitching line above the original horizontal pocket line.   You want to attach them so that this new stitching is slightly shorter than the attached welt pocket (see my vertical pins that mark my start/ stop lines).  Think about what you want to be the inside of the pocket bag – in this case I sewed the wrong side pocket bag with right side of sweatshirt body & will end up with the fleece on the inside of the pocket bags – this can show up, you may want to sew right side of pocket bag to right side of sweatshirt.

Linden pockets 5Next is the cutting in between these two rows of stitching.  This is what it looks like from the inside.  Only cut the sweatshirt (not the pockets or welts) & cut diagonal snips close to the edges/ corners of the stitching.  Pull pocket bags inside through these cuts & place the welts to sit in their intended final position, right way up.  You’ve got some neatening to do next – like sewing the triangles at the side of each cut line (caused by the diagonal snips) to the body of the sweatshirt.  The welts also need to be topstitched down at each short edge, and the top of each pocket bag needs to be sewn to the seam allowance of its welt.  You can then settle the pocket bags, pin & sew to form the pockets.

Linden pockets 6Sort of like this.  Then make up your sweatshirt as normal.  (I used a regular machine with a straight stitch for most of the pocket stitching even thought this is a knit fabric.)

Linden pockets 7But the question remains…will I hide these or not?

Linden Sweatshirt – a well worn test

I have seen so many tempting versions of the Linden Sweatshirt, by Grainline, that in the end I weakened & coughed up for my own version. Eminently wearable loungewear was my thinking. All I needed was some sweatshirting.

Linden

I had my ribbing, this awesome turquoise knit ribbing from Plush Addict (remember a little goes a very long way – I bought a metre and anticipate a wardrobe of knits coordinated by their ribbing!)

Linden sweatshirt

Sweatshirting was on my shopping list when I went to Goldhawk road the last time & I found some that suited my needs – a funky enough colour, & with a fluffy reverse but with a not-too shiny right side- some sweatshirting looks to me to be too polyester-y – I want soft & matt please. But clearly in Goldhawk Road I was also looking for a bargain.

I found this, but please don’t ask me which shop. It was excellent value, and came as a tube. Unfortunately it wasn’t until I cut it out that I discovered fade lines which has therefore rendered this sweatshirt as definite domestic use only, as I could not cut around the fade marks.

Linden sweatshirt

See fade mark through the mid sleeve

Heyho. Never mind. I still wear it – a lot.  Beacause this is SOOOO cosy and warm.  It’s a winter domestic essential, seriously.

I enjoyed making my Linden, but think there is room for improvement. The neckline could be a little bit more uniform – even though I always tend to overlock neckbands with an eye on the finished band width rather than the seam allowance I am cutting off, there are a few places that are narrower than others, & with a contrast ribbing this shows more.

Linden

The Linden is very boxy, although the arms in this version at least are reasonably narrow fitting considering the amount of “box” in the body. I don’t mind this, but could think about fitting my next one just a smidgeon. I also think that it looks far better being worn with skinnies than it does being worn with my (coordinated ribbing) Hudsons. When worn together I look as if I am either about to enter a ballpool, playing with the other toddlers, or else am in custody.

Linden

Anway, I have more sweatshirting now,

Linden

it’s like, emerald green!  From Ebay.  Should I be tempted by other colours in the Plush Addict range or should I stick with turquoise?

Options could be emerald with …

Green

 

Yellow – too boy scouts?

Purple!

Grey??

Too much choice!  I also like the idea of making a baggy short sleeved t-shirt too sometime. Looks like Linden & I have a nice future ahead of us!