Category Archives: Adventures in Overlocking

Barrie Boy Cut Briefs !

Just a quick one and a chance to see my underneathies!

I love trying out new underwear patterns and sometimes making smalls is just the job for a satisfying journey into practicality with a little experimentation thrown in.

Barrie

Why experimentation? Well despite increasing the success rate (ie wearable) of my hand made pants, I still feel unable to predict the success of each fresh pair I cut out to sew. Maybe that is because I tend to use fabrics in my stash and dig out ‘any old’ stretch elastic I have in my strecth elastic stash. The result has created some baggy saggies that feel a bit mismatched, and also some brighty tighties that are just plain uncomfortable but only a waste of the hour I spent making them.

The back

The back

My favorite pants pattern up until Barrie has been the Rosy Lady shorts by Cloth Habit. They are free! And the success rate is highest for me with this pattern & I understand the odds better matching elastic & fabric with this style. But then along came Barrie Boy Cut briefs, from Kitschy Koo.

Barrie briefs

Barries are shorts too, designed to hug underneath those buns, & not cut across cellulite thus resulting in a far less likely incidence of the dreaded VPL. The pattern has two options for rise, but I have made low rise. What’s really different about Barrie is that they do not use any form of elastic but are constructed using fabric bands – much as binding off a neckline. Therefore if you are a little nervous of applying stretch elastic or FoE (Fold Over Elastic) these are the pants for you – entry level pants. ?Trainer pants? Er, that might give the wrong impression, but they are easy to make!  I made mine all on my overlocker.

barrie briefs 2015 collection

These are all the pairs of Barrie briefs I have made since originally being asked to test them months ago now. And they are amazingly comfortable. I think you could use stretch elastic instead of the bands if you wanted to – in fact I will try that one day, but for now, I have just been enjoying whipping up a portfolio of these – not quite one for every day of the week, but nearly!

And you don’t have to make them so vibrant, but there was something very inspiring about this pattern &  in the company of other testers who also use Amanda’s most awesome fabrics (I mean superhero cat pants anyone??)  that made me want to deploy some of my favorite tshirt scraps into undies!

headband

Tutorial: Sewing a headband using jersey

I have been promising this for a while, but it was so wrapped up in all the marathon excitement I wonder if anyone even remembered?  Here is the headband.  A nice little weekend project?

Jersey Headband

 

Can you see that it doesn’t use elastic and is just made out of a single piece of jersey.  It can be scrunched up on your head to be as wide or as folded up as you need it to be- to keep the sun off your head, to keep pesky short haircuts under control and hopefully longer styles too (not that I would know about that).

This is me wearing it….it matches my top 😉 I needed it to be wide enough to keep my hair from poking out like a crazy person.  (Ironic)

What you need:

A piece of jersey fabric with some stretch that can wrap around your head where a headband would sit.  The fabric needs to have enough recovery so that your headband will stretch to stay on your head snugly but will easily return to its original size and not sag  once stretched!

Mine is about 46cm x 18cm.  You need to experiment to get a snug fit.  I guess you could try measuring your head & deducting 15% to get the long measurement but I have not tested this to know if it is a good idea!  Low tech method –  I wrapped the fabric around my head & stretched it a bit, holding the place I thought the seam joining the ends was needed with my fingers.  And then marked this with a pin before laying the fabric out flat & preparing my seam.

Headband 1

Sewing the tube to fit snugly around my head- you might need to make a few seams to get the fit right.

So prepare your seam by folding your fabric in half right sides together so that the shorter sides are together & sew where you think the seam needs to be.  Use a short zig zag stitch, an overlock stitch or your serger.

And then try on for size.  I had to sew another seam to make the tube of fabric small enough so that it felt a good snug fit like you would expect of your headband.

headband 2

Finishing the edges with my overlocker

Next finish the long now tubular edges of your headband with an overlocker or a zig zag stitch.  You might decide you don’t need to do this, maybe your jersey isn’t looking messy & jerseys don’t fray afterall, but as I have an overlocker it makes the edges look nice & neat.

headband 3

Darning in the ends

Darn the ends in if you have used an overlocker/ serger.

Next you are going to sew with a regular machine using the zig zag stitch to make pleats in the underneath of your headband so that the pleats reduce the fabric and makes it a lot more wearable underneath the back of your head.

You will be making three pleats with the centre back seam running at right angles down the middle of the pleats ( & the back of your head.)  Each line of stitching is 16cm long and parallel to each other.

headband

Three pleats sewn with a zig zag stitch make the headband narrower at the back

To do this …

First of all fold the headband in half, right sides together, centre back seam on top &  with the long edges matching.  Pin to secure.  Your stitching line will start 8 cm before the centre back seam and finish 8 cm beyond it and will be 1.5cm (or 5/8″) away from the folded edge.    Mark your start & finish points & start your zig zag seamed pleat.  Make sure you back tack at the start & the finish to ensure the seams do not unravel.

 

headband 4

Sewing the first pleat. The pin marks my finish point.

Now it’s time to make the next pleat.  I measured 3cm from the edge to make the fold for the next pleat, pinning to secure, and measuring the start and finish marks at 8cm either side of the centre back seam.

headband 5

Pinning the next pleat- on all these pleats it’s nice to match the centre back seam line through the layers with a pin.

Sew this with a zig zag stitch with a seam 1.5cm  from the folded edge.

headband 6

Sewing the side pleats

Do the same for the other side pleat.  And voila!  Nearly there.

headband 8

Admire your handiwork

It’s a good idea to control those side pleats underneath so that they lie flat while you wear it & don’t try to poke out .   Fold each pleat towards the centre & pin.  Topstitch over the folded pleat using a zig zag, right sides up, close to the seam.

headband 9

Top stitching the side pleats with a zig zag

You’re done!

headband 10

 

Wear it well, wear it happy!

headband 11

 

u badger

feature

Seamwork Oslo cardigan

I finally got round to making up one of the patterns from the very first Seamwork magazine, from Colette Patterns.

oslo

Yes, my Dad took these photos!

This is the Oslo cardigan in red. This is some kind of a sweater knit that I had in my stash (cheap from Abakhan once upon a time). It has a loose knit & a degree of cotton in the fibres. But anymore than that I do not know. It appeared to be prone to unravelling more than your usual knit, so I was prepared to treat the cut edges with care & as always  make sure everything was finished with my overlocker.

oslo 2

Anyway, the Oslo is a cosy cardigan, well suited to snuggling when made in something warm, but I made it up in this light weight knit with great swing, as a summer knit. I rushed it in time for my Cornish Whitsun week away as my other red cardigan has suffered from a traumatic visit to the vet’s & the lacerations caused by poor Merlin’s razor sharp claws (& you should have seen the dress & my skin underneath!) have rendered it rather scruffy….

oslo 3

Armed with the knowledge that this wardrobe building pattern is a quick make – this is the premise for the Seamwork patterns- I took to making it up in time for my holiday. And I wasn’t disappointed. It is simple to make – as with most knit tops sleeves are inserted flat, then the side seams & sleeve seams sewn in one operation. The sleeves are finished with cuffs & the cardigan’s hem is stitched before attaching the long collar along the front & neck edges in one long go.

oslo 4

I love the long collar.

oslo 5

Ooops, eyes closed!

Are you interested in a hem sewing tip for loose knits that are more likely to flute out at their edges? I find that using some kind of hemming tape that dissolves after the first wash (like this but mine was something different) is a great way to control the hem edge where you want it, much more thoroughly than pressing it would achieve.

oslo 6

I’ve really enjoyed having a cardigan like this to wear. I haven’t added any fastenings to it, but it is so very arm-huggingly-wrappable – that pose that often gets assumed by the seaside, to keep the sea breeze at bay!

oslo 7

The cuffs are vvveeerrrryyyy long too, so they can be folded to keep your wrists warm, or unfolded to snuggle chilly hands.  This is the pattern I will use for at least one of my purple cardigans– for my Mum.  She wants a cardi with 3/4 or even 1/2 length sleeves.  She’s a layering lady!

And following on from its original week away by the sea, it is a great casual cardi, worn with the ‘more casual’ side of my wardrobe.  At the moment I am sat writing wearing it with a white vest top & my Floral Hudsons.  It’s getting worked!

snakey legs

Snakeskin leggings!

And torso too!

The fabric people, is the star! This is some pink/purple snakeskin effect lycra from the Fabric Godmother & it totally rocks! (And you can take that whatever way you want, even if you want to bring out that inner rock chick….) But don’t let me go away without mentioning the gold sheen that makes this fabric shine. There is definitely something of the wild side in this print!  And I never thought I would have snakeskin leggings, but I think for running in, I can kind of get away with it.

snakey legs

Josie asked me if I would like to test it for running in, & I was unable to resist. It has recently starred on her blog.  There are three snakeskin lycras currently stocked- this one, a neon explosion (even I thought there was a bit too much dazzle for me!) & black. Now I try to avoid making anything for running out of black, but snakeskin – that could persuade me!

 

I used the Virginia leggings pattern by Megan Nielson as I wanted as little interference as possible with seams, & the Virginias have just one seam. I made them capri length & added some little cuffs to them, as I had recently made the Seamwork Manila leggings & was interested in taking that detail on to capris to see how that worked. (And the answer?  It’s a nice detail but I didn’t get the sizing quite right & it’s a bit flappy)

3 (2)

So the fabric. The lycra feels lovely to wear. A good weight with no danger of any translucency. However, this is not breathable or wicking fabric, but as long as you are aware of this & choose to wear when you’re not going to overheat, then the fabric works great. I wore them for the first time at a “Glow Run” – a 5km fun run – we were all decorated with neon face paint & glow sticks. Photos show my leggings shining in the light with an eerie glow!

glow run

I have also worn them on some fresh spring runs, of about an hour, & once again, nothing but fun wearing them.   As the weather has warmed I reserve them for non cardio vascular exercise – weight training last week – & they were fine, but a tad on the warm side power walking uphill in the full sun afterwards.  They will really come into their own again in the autumn &  in the winter I can forsee this fabric being quite the way to fox up some country runs!!!

But Josie in her blog talks about using it for swimwear.  It’s certainly a nice light weight & I could imagine that working well.  Now if I have enough spare maybe I could eek out a bikini, but I am not sure if I have because I also made an XYT top out of it.

I think it looks cool?

snakey xyt

 

Forgive me for not showing you the back, as you can tell this is a spontaneous modelling shot & I’m wearing the wrong underwear- the back looked atrocious with the bra showing….

Now, are you wondering whether I will have the gall to wear them both together?  Do you doubt my taste that much?  I am not even going there!  No!  Not even in the interest of science.  We all know it would look , just, creepy.  All-over-body-suit-snakeskin?  No thank you!!  But apart, they are, like I said foxy.  If foxy is an apt adjective when referring to reptile effect fabric.

And right now I am imagining one of those one-piece costumes with holes cut out of the side.  Not on me though!  My skin tans far too easily to go for such shapes!  But this fabric (in black or purple) would look pretty awesome on the Cote D’Azur, wouldn’t you say?

Now tell me, who would wear the top & leggings together?  I would love to know …..
(The fabric was provided by Fabric Godmother for me to review.  )

feature

My new teal woolly is the Jenna cardigan!

So you saw that I had a new, unblogged and much worn cardigan last month in Me made May (seen in the third week, here).  Time to reveal the identity (unless you already worked it out for yourselves!) This is my Minerva Blogging Network make from last month that owing to all sorts of pressures I arranged some slippage on my deadline.  But I can now show you all.

You would have seen from my May wearings that I wear cardigans a lot.

jenna 1

I am in complete envy of Dolly Clackett’s rainbow hoard of cardigans – she can pluck a coordinating cardi for any of her wonderfully colourful dresses & look feminine, stylish & warm. When you get on the “I really want to make all of my own clothes & not buy anything” bug, knitwear is the hardest to handle. It is hard to perfect a cardigan that replicates the fine gauge machine-knitted M&S round neck. I have considered taking up knitting – & have knitted a cardigan, but that took the best part of the year, is expensive on wool & is more of a winter weight. I have tried therefore to sew some cardigans, using Simplicity 2154 & McCalls 6708, to varying degrees of success. But still the finish was distinctly sewn & a bit clumsy. And then there came the Jenna cardigan by Muse patterns.

jenna 2

My first Jenna cardigan is a huge success & gets worn frequently. I love the gathered yoke detail, the button band & the depth of the neck line. I also love the way that this particular version sits at waist level- that works for me- it’s a length that suits me.

jenna 3

I remember when making it that it was straight forward & that the instructions comprehensively steered me through any of the areas I might have come a cropper – eg where the neck joins the button band. Therefore, it seemed a good time to make another one.

jenna 4

I chose this John Kaldor Isabella wool-viscose jersey in teal (you know by now that I love teal!) for last month’s Minerva Blogging network project. It is on the upper price range for jersey but fair to say that the price is standard as far as wool jerseys come– but is definitely yummy quality- & with the wool content I thought it would be ideal as a cardigan.

Sewing this jersey though was a pleasure, from gathering the yokes, to setting the neck band. The button bands are interfaced (as per the pattern’s instructions) & it gives it enough strength & structure – making sewing buttonholes easy.

These buttons were from my stash & I love the bronze with the teal – it works really well as a colour combo I think.

jenna 5

I don’t have much to say about the construction of the cardigan that I have not already said before.  Except I did narrow the sleeves just a smidgeon plus took some off the length.

It is my favorite cardigan pattern, by far & Kat has really drafted an excellent pattern. Maybe I should try the plain un-yoked version, but I love the yoke detail too much.

jenna 6

It’s much like my love of red Thai veg curry – it is beyond a shadow of a doubt the most amazing dish I have ever eaten such that every time I go out for Thai I cannot bring myself to experiment as I couldn’t bear to experience anything less perfect!

jenna 7

And you can bet that as soon as I finished it, it has sprung into action & is worn a lot. It is a more summery colour than my grey Jenna cardigan & is delicious to wear. I love wearing teal with red (& I have a lot of red in my wardrobe). And as our summer hasn’t really started yet, it really is getting a lot of use over dresses, t-shirts & tops ….with trousers or skirts. It’s a new wardrobe basic.

jenna 8

The fabric and thread was supplied by Minerva as part of the Minerva Blogging Network.  You can visit my project on Minerva’s site if you want an easy way to see which fabric was provided to me & thread to match.  That is, if you are a cardigan person :-)

shorts

Tropical reef runners! Jalie 3351

Good morning!  I was asked to take part in Dress Up Party that’s happening this month at Sewsweetness – check it out, there’s loads  of pattern reviews (like sometimes several in a day!) going on there!  For my part I contributed my first attempt (so far) of Jalie 3351.

I shall give you a summary here, but for more information head on over to find out more :-)

DressUpParty

I have made the Jalie running skort a few times & have been so impressed with it that I recently invested in Jalie 3351, described as ‘swim shorts’ as they have integral undies.  Having made them up I can see they would be excellent as swim shorts! But that was not why I bought the pattern. I was first intrigued when Dawn, from Two on Two Off, a prolific sewist, blogger & amazing runner shared her version that she made for running. I tucked this away, with interest, but no commitment at that point. And months later Maria from How Good is That made some swim shorts using the same pattern.

When I looked it up I found it was available as a pdf download & went for it. In the UK you can get Jalie patterns from Habithat & the turnaround is very speedy! Here’s the pattern if you are buying in UK.

shorts 1

Well I made them up using my remainder of tropical reef fabric from Funki Fabrics which would be totally suitable for using for swim shorts as well (in fact that’s what Maria used, above). But remember that this fabric is not however strictly speaking “ wicking or breathable” but I forsee it being less of a problem, even on warmer days, when so much of my legs are actually out. We shall of course see! No days warm enough here yet to try out. I made them without the integral undies – just shorts. They have a side panel constructed very much like the skort (2796) to create a side pocket & interesting shaped hem.

shorts 2

What was really odd to me was the way the waistband was sewn. I still can’t get my head around it to explain it in any way useful, but it looks really neat on the outside.

shorts3

I am not 100% sure that I got it right….it looks as if there is excess on the inside, but it is very comfy to wear. Dawn explains it much better than me & hers look like the facing is not baggy on the inside.  In fact I wished I’d gone back to Dawn’s post when I was making them, as I think I would have done it differently …

Now the wearing. They are SHORT! I have to confess that the public at large did not get to see this much of my spring legs wobbling around on my run- I wore inner lycra shorts underneath & felt more decent :-)

shorts 4

But it has to be said, I do really love running in shorts & these are no exception. I like the pattern. I love that I have fishes on them & that if I want, I can use them at the beach too….

scuba circle skirt feature

Tropical jungle explosion- scuba circle skirt!

I have already shown you this skirt… hanging on rather a run of the mill wooden coat hanger against a rather mundane white door.  But this, I think, is not a mundane skirt.  Absolutely not.

This wild scuba fabric  was a surprise gift from Josie at Fabric Godmother – she picked out something that she thought I would like.  Such great gift-picking- it is totally me!  It’s positively bursting with vibrant colours, lush tropical flowers with a very cheeky blend of leopard skin thown in!  I know of quite a few people who would be drawn to this fabric hahaha!

scuba circle skirt 1

So, this is scuba, and to be honest I had been a bit unsure of scuba.  What to use it for?  I did not really think I was a bodycon dress wearer.  Marie at A Stitching Odyssey made a scuba skater dress (in fabric that looks very similar too!)  But as it was coming into Spring, did I really want to make a dress out of something so “polyestery”?  And that’s where my imagination stopped.  Until that is I saw a post on the Fabric Godmother’s blog where she used black scuba to make a Hollyburn skirt.  That really opened my eyes – you mean scuba can be used for skirts….with pockets?  (I am wary of assuming  knits can handle pockets – side seam pockets & even the front pockets as on a Hollyburn- because I think you need a knit with some kind of a structure for the latter & am still uncertain about side seam pockets per se for most knits ….but that’s probably my own experience & not having cracked it yet).

scuba circle skirt 2

OK, sorry, back to scuba and skirts.  I googled ‘scuba skirt’ & then narrowed in on either a scuba circle skirt or a scuba skater skirts.  It became clear to me that I had enough fabric to make a circle skirt & that the scuba would give it structure, yet its weight should allow it to hang pretty well but with a sleek waist.  No more prevaricating.  The whole decision process possibly took longer than the making once I had decided.

scuba circle skirt 3

I used the Cake Pavlova skirt as I had previously made it in jersey (& linen here) & the jersey skirt has had a lot of wear & it is one of my faves.  It has two seams & a waistband.  The waistband is elasticated for the knit version.  I omitted the pocket this time as I thought it would mess up the already wild print  & would take extra time!  This skirt, people, took next to no time to make!  But this is just a circle skirt, people.  In a knit, perhaps one of the easiest skirts to make- seriously.  No fastenings.  Sew with a stretch stitch/ narrow zig zag or an overlocker & you’re away.

waistband

And guess what else saves time?  Following Josie’s example I have left the hem unsewn & unfinished.  [Gasp]  I let the skirt hang a few days before measuring up from the floor ….& I just cut the hem at the length I wanted.  It feels kind of naughty!

scuba circle skirt 4

Now wearing this skirt is like a breath of fresh air.  It really does hang beautifully & being a circle skirt is not too bulky around the waist.  I hate to say it but the elastic waist is also very comfortable (OMG I must be getting old!!!!! )  I would love to be wearing it as I am modelling it, wedges & bare legs- but I’ve had to layer up & stick leggings underneath it to stop the May chills.  In my view though this is one of those pieces that glams up causal wear! (even with leggings on!)  And being a circle skirt it is so much fun moving around in it, letting the wind catch it (encouraging the wind to catch it too!), swooping down the stairs.  Heaps of pleasure for those of us easily pleased :-)

Now I understand if this fabric isn’t quite to your everyday wear, but there are quite a few scuba fabrics at Fabric Godmother – some more prints as well as some gorgeous solid colours with embossed details in them (so not “plain” at all but very practical !).

I am no longer fearful of scuba!  Hurrah!  I get it!

marathon

Trying to stand out amongst the 40,000- marathon outfit

You might know that I am running the London marathon on Sunday.  Yes, all sorts of emotions are circulating, this is going to be the experience and pinnacle of my running adventures and I am going out there to soak it all up.  It’s about enjoying as many of the 26.2 miles as possible, not about a time.  I may have to walk, that’s OK.  I might take 4 and a half hours, I am more likely to take five or more.  That is OK too.  My goal is only to enjoy the amazing experience that is the London marathon.  The sights, the crowds, the other participants…..I mean it’s the biggest….& I am incredibly lucky to have some awesome support.  My family and friends are coming to London to cheer me on!  And my parents will be watching all the coverage on the off chance that they can catch a glimpse of me.  So I want to make it easy to spot me in the sea of runners.  I know I will need to feel their love, it’s helped me – the only other time I completed a marathon– at critical times.  Of course I decided to make my own marathon outfit.

marathon

I took ages choosing fabrics on Spoonflower with the primary aim of looking as stand out as possible amongst a mass of colour and fancy dress.

I looked at fabrics as if I was seeing them from afar.  Using the performance knit, again I made the top out of these rainbow scallops and the skirt out of these fishy scales in turquoise and white.  Remember, I wasn’t trying to look neat & matchy but as eye catching as possible without becoming Mario, She-Ra, Paddington Bear or an oversized item of kitchen equipment.

I can’t tell you any more about the top and skirt as the skirt is made up by me, and the top has mutated too much from its original for me to even remember where it started.

I will be sharing a tutorial soon for how to make the headband though.

headband

There is a bit of a theme…..my friend has given me nails that on their own will stand out from the crowd!!

marathon nails

And I added rainbow elastic to my bumbag to match the rainbow ribbons another friend gave me that I have added to my shoes :-)

gadget

Worried about how to carry various bits & pieces around, I also made an armband using my lucky badger fabric – I only had enough to make the pocket, but it’s badger power!  I used Melissa’s free and revamped running armband pattern, available here.  Super useful – & btw it comes in different sizes.

armband

Now lovely readers, here’s the thing.  If you are watching, you might even spot me now.  I know when I watched last year (the origin of my entry this year!), with the vain hope of spotting people I knew were running, I had no idea even of what colours they were wearing.  Maybe you’ll catch a glimpse of the rainbow?

And if any of you are in the crowds….please shout for me!  There might be times when I REALLY need some words of encouragement.

If I am looking like this- that’s good, cheer me on!

marathon

 

If I am looking like this….

marathonGet me back on my feet!  Even more so if I am in this position….bring me gin!

marathon And don’t let me get like this until the end …

marathon But hopefully this is my end…

marathon 7Followed by loads of hugs (maybe with random strangers as well as loved ones) & a hobble to an Italian for the best pint of beer & pizza – ever.

u badger

To anyone else running the marathon this Sunday, have a great time & I hope you get what you want out of it too. xx  To anyone who shouts for me a massive thank you in advance- you won’t know just how much it will help us all :-)

 

 

 

 

Surf to summit badger

Surf to summit running top – a very personal edition

I don’t just sew clothes for running, despite a recent spate, but since I have some new photos to share, here is the running top that was always meant to be.  For me, that is.  And you’ve already see why :-)

Last year I invested in some Spoonflower fabric when there was a free shipping deal.  Along with the floral leggings of nothing but flowers, I also bought some badger fabric in performance knit.  When I went back to Spoonflower to link to the fabric I had used, I am sure there are now more badger prints than there were when I made my choice,   Are badgers actually cool to anyone else but me?

surf to summit badger

 

Anyway, this was always going to be a top, but just which top to make?  It was not clear until the Surf to Summit top pattern came out from Fehr Trade.  I have made a few of these and love the high neckline & long sleeves (with mitts) & general slim-but-not-too-slim fit for winter running.

With just a metre of badger fabric I needed to add some contrast & had some cream wicking lycra that matched the badger fabric well enough. That’s another  good thing about the Surf to Summit top- plenty of pieces for playing around with colour blocking (or eeking out fabric!)  Actually if it was 100% badger, maybe that would have been too much?

Surf to summit badger (2)

But it’s Spring!  Yes, I know.  The chances of me getting much wear out of this top this side of the year dramatically reduced as soon as the clocks changed, but you know, there could still be a frost half way into May according to the gardeners I know.  An evening run in some inclement weather may require the badger to be brought forth!  Otherwise it can have some summer hibernation, far away from any horrible busy roads! ( And there is an option to make a short sleeved surf to summit top but I wanted it to be for winter running you see.)

Surf to summit badger (3)

So you know I have already reviewed this top pattern here & another example here.  I am still not quite there with perfecting my fit, & luckily for me, I was able to discuss with my sewing guru (my Mum).  Nothing I can do for this particular top, which is OK as it is completely wearable.  But my next version will involve increasing the size to give more room in the top, bicep part of my sleeve, & probably a bit more scooping under the arm too.  I think I must have flabby armpits (NICE!  The things we share in the interest of sewing learning!).

Surf to summit badger (4)

Mitts folded back on one hand, in operation on the other.

 

You can see in the pic above that if you are using a fabric with a right & wrong side, that you need to decide which version of the mitts gets the right side.  For me, and the way the pattern instructs you, is to make the open cuff show the fabric’s best side & mitts deployed show the fabric’s wrong side.  This works out fine for this version especially with that cream contrast – almost looks like I designed it that way!

The other lucky thing was that my Dad, enjoyed being the man behind the camera as I larked around in the misconception that I needed to do something silly to entertain him.

surf to summit badger (6)

I didn’t stay still for long enough.  It must be the lycra.  And I didn’t come prepared with a whole running outfit to model.  Ultimate Trousers as jeans if you are interested. :-)

Surf to summit badger (5)

I have some scraps of badger fabric left & have been inspired on Twitter by what to use it for.  Possibly a Steeplechase leggings yoke, an armband pocket for gel carrying, & / or some badger running bows.  So even though this will not be coming with me to London for the marathon, some scrap of badger will.  (And let’s hope it’ll be more than just a scrap of me left at the end 😉  )

Moneta feature

Moneta Monday?

It’s exactly a week since my last Moneta post, and here I am with another one to show you- a Moneta dress (by Colette Patterns) made using some lovely teal interlock from Plush Addict.(Disclaimer I received this fabric free from Plush Addict to review)

Moneta

Now remember,  Moneta is Colette Pattern’s pattern of the month.  And  there is a 20%. discount if you want to buy it this month too- marvelloso! Follow that link!

Moneta

Now it’s only recently that I became aware of what interlock actually is, & ask me a couple of months ago what it was, & I would only be able to suggest that it was some kind of jersey, but I had no more knowledge than that.  It all changed when I read the article in Seamwork about doubleknits by Alyson Clair & discovered What you clever folk will doubtless already know, that interlock is a kind of double knit (or double knit is a kind of interlock hahaha).  She writes, “Interlock jersey is in fact a double jersey, with a smooth surface on each side. The wales of the fabric on each side are alternated, with the back loops knitted together. This means both sides of an interlock will look the same”.  And the penny dropped.  This interlock is indeed more structured than the Liberty jersey I made my last Moneta out of.  It has less drape & it’s one of those knits whose edges behave & don’t curl up.  It’s easy to work with, & as you’ll see it gathers easily, so it’s not that thick, in fact it feels like quality t-shirts from M&S that your Mum rates highly.  It has less stretch & recovery though, so I would reckon it’s not such a good choice for leggings & truly figure hugging things.

Moneta

I chose it based on its colour, with a Moneta in mind.  I LOVE teal.  But it’s one of those colours that are sometimes hard to find, which is why I snap them up when I do find them (& why you might be under the illusion that they are common place based on how often I make things up in teal!).

Moneta

I have already peeled on about how I have found making the Moneta (easy).  I took some photos this time of the elastic waist shirring process.

Fun hey?!  Then there was the collar.  More on that in a minute, but look what happened.

Blade needs changing

This is the ugly mess that results in the overlocker blade not being able to cope with the thickness of fabrics.  YUK.  It persuaded me to get my screwdriver out & replace the blade.  Only, when I came to swap the old for the spare (provided at time of purchase), they were different sizes, so I had to put the old one back in.  SOB.  At least I tried.  I won’t be so scared next time.

 

So, let’s talk about the collar.  Once again, I opted for a collar, not wanting the plain turned under neckline.  I wanted to make the roll collar, which has been designed with a two piece back.  But I just couldn’t shake off the desire to make it without a break in the back, and using the roll back that is used for the tie collar.  I am sure there is a practical reason for making both these neckline options split either in the front (the tie) or the back (the roll collar), but perversely I had to find out for myself & potentially make the mistake, ignoring the styles provided & cobbling together the roll collar front & the tie collar back.  Nothing special needed for this, since the bodice & neckline shape does not vary, so the collars all fit & are therefore potentially interchangeable.  I was preparing myself for a fall however.

 

Shall I tell you now?  Did I make a boo boo?  Well I don’t think so….as far as I could guess, the practical reasons for the collar being split in the original designs could be either to make the collar sit down at the back/ front & not flip up.  There is a slight tendency for my collar to be a bit perky, but once under a cardigan it gets flattened into submission.  The other reason is to tell which is the front & which is the back!  Hahaha.  I need to sew a ribbon or something into the back as the only way I can tell is to look at the shoulders to see which way the seams are facing!

Moneta

So that’s my teal Moneta dress.  I have three Monetas now, & they are so easy to wear – extremely comfy for working at home too.  I could see a sleeveless version in my summer future (with a collar of some description) – but for now, I think three “semi wintry” versions that will also see me into Spring is enough for now- so no Moneta next Monday- promise!  Have you see the tips for Moneta month – especially how to bind the edges?  I like the sound of that!