Linden Sweatshirt x2 or just because you can sew welt pockets doesn’t mean you should ….

Before I share a couple of Linden Sweatshirts, I’d like to thank you all for the suggestions about what to do with my boiled wool in the last post.  I will check out all the ideas you’ve left – I knew you wouldn’t let me down!  There are a few ideas for Schnittchen patterns – coatigans/ jackets which are intriguing – never sewn any of these before.  You can bet I’ll keep you posted …

But today I’ve some Linden sweatshirts to show you that I made up this week.  After deciding to upgrade my ‘test Linden sweatshirt’ & putting it in writing to the world the other day, I sprung into action & cut two out.  The first was in the green sweatshirting that I had set aside, an eBay purchase along with the ribbing from Plush Addict.  The second was a lucky extra – I had enough of some lightweight grey marl sweater knit that I had left over after making a cardigan, Simplicity 2154 .

Linden grey marl

But there wasn’t enough to make any of the neck, hem or cuff bands out of the grey so I had to pick some contrast ribbing- also from Plush Addict – & I am so glad I was forced along this route as I am immensely pleased with this particular Linden – I love the way the lighter weight fabric allows a bit of drape & it totally suits the wider neckline.

Linden grey marl (2)

And the pop of turquoise knit rib gives it a definite edge that a plain grey Linden sweatshirt would not have.  I have worn this a couple of days (in the warehouse job with jeans) & oops I see a bit of a smudge on it, so it is now in the wash.  My pink skirt (A Tilly and the Buttons Airielle)  is also victim of tending a woodfire but only revealed to me in these photos.  At least I am living up to my ‘scruffy’ name….

Linden grey marl (3)

As usual I ramble and am talking about the results before the process.  This is OK for the grey sweatshirt because what else do you need to know?  It has worked out better than I hoped & was a great sew.  But I have made more than one, on the same day, but this other is controversial….and I haven’t made my mind up about it yet, and as a result have not worn it outside yet….

Linden with pocketsYes it has pocketses.  Welt pockets.  And I conjured up this plan whilst cutting out.  But here’s the thang.  I do not think it works as a wearable item of clothing.  Isn’t it a bit ….. crafty?  Is it a classic case of ‘just because you can add welt pockets to a sweatshirt, it doesn’t mean that you should …’??

Linden with pockets (2)The cosy side of the fleece (sweatshirting’s wrong side) hosts my hands as the pocket inners.  But that is not the reason I created welt pockets.  The idea was to have a safe place to carry my phone when working in the warehouse (I’ve a new phone & want to look after it y’see).

Linden with pockets (3)Keeps it safe, is just the right size (bigger than an iPhone) & means I can access music on the go too.

Linden with pockets (4)But just because I can sew welt pockets doesn’t mean it’s right.  Is it the contrast ribbing? I am tempted to unpick the lower front half of the sweatshirt and add a kind of ‘kangaroo’ pocket on top of the welt pockets, hiding the original pockets under a more anonymous generic self-fabric pocket, whilst allowing the original pockets to function.  With side hand entry.  What do you think?

What’s funny is that I was so confident in this design detail that I even took photos of the steps along the way to add welt pockets.   I drafted them myself & referred to the instructions in the Colette Patterns Anise jacket to guide me.  I am not going to waste the photos, but share them with a touch of caution – use this wisely and don’t end up in the same dilemma I am in.  Remember the mantra & repeat after me- ‘Just because you can sew welt pockets, it doesn’t mean that it’s the right thing to do’

I’m going to note the steps I took – but please don’t treat this as a definitive guide for sewing welt pockets – there are plenty of others about with all of the steps clearly illustrated.  (OMG this tutorial from Workroom Social is just so incredibly neat & clear showing a single stage welt pocket – not separately pieced welts)  This tutorial on Craftsy uses a similar approach that I have taken.  However if you have done a few welts in your time, mine below might serve as an aide memoir … as that is what it will be for me…

So first of all I marked the horizontal placement of the welts pockets, referring to the size of my phone as a guide.  Going forward you might want to draw on stitching lines – above & below these horizontal lines.  Tip – Stitching lines on a single welt are less critical than for bound buttonholes which is like a double welt with two welt pieces that need to meet nicely in the middle.  Single welts do not need to meet anything else – it’s just about how deep you want your welt to be.  So relax a bit.  I did.  My stitching lines were about 1/2″ either side of the original horizontal line.

Linden pockets 1I then cut the welts so that they were longer than the horizontal welt lines (to provide a good seam allowance) & width was calculated by doubling the finished welt depth & adding seam allowances x2.   (But more on welt depth/ width calculations below). I interfaced each welt.

Linden pockets 2

And then I cut pocket bags about the same width as the ribbing welt’s long measurement.   Have a play with the folded pocket bag to make sure it doesn’t poke out underneath your hem!  Adjust if necessary.

Linden pockets 3Next, make the welts – fold in half right sides together and sew each of the short ends.  Turn right sides out and press & baste the open long edges together.

Placing the welts to attach to the sweatshirt requires a bit of thought- the welts are sewn at the lower stitching line (upside down) & because I was feeling relaxed about the precise size of the finished welt, I placed the raw edge alongside the original horizontal pocket line.  However, if you are more specific about the finished depth of the welt, you need to make sure that the depth of the stitched folded welt is equal to the desired finished welt depth plus the distance between original horizontal pocket line & stitching line on the sweatshirt front.  I would trim the welt to this depth before I attached it so that I could place the raw cut edge against the original horizontal stitching line.  I would also transfer the stitching line to the top of the welt to make sure I sewed along the right line.  (Does that make sense?)

Linden pockets 4Now onto the pocket bags.  They are attached ‘upside down’  to the stitching line above the original horizontal pocket line.   You want to attach them so that this new stitching is slightly shorter than the attached welt pocket (see my vertical pins that mark my start/ stop lines).  Think about what you want to be the inside of the pocket bag – in this case I sewed the wrong side pocket bag with right side of sweatshirt body & will end up with the fleece on the inside of the pocket bags – this can show up, you may want to sew right side of pocket bag to right side of sweatshirt.

Linden pockets 5Next is the cutting in between these two rows of stitching.  This is what it looks like from the inside.  Only cut the sweatshirt (not the pockets or welts) & cut diagonal snips close to the edges/ corners of the stitching.  Pull pocket bags inside through these cuts & place the welts to sit in their intended final position, right way up.  You’ve got some neatening to do next – like sewing the triangles at the side of each cut line (caused by the diagonal snips) to the body of the sweatshirt.  The welts also need to be topstitched down at each short edge, and the top of each pocket bag needs to be sewn to the seam allowance of its welt.  You can then settle the pocket bags, pin & sew to form the pockets.

Linden pockets 6Sort of like this.  Then make up your sweatshirt as normal.  (I used a regular machine with a straight stitch for most of the pocket stitching even thought this is a knit fabric.)

Linden pockets 7But the question remains…will I hide these or not?

41 thoughts on “Linden Sweatshirt x2 or just because you can sew welt pockets doesn’t mean you should ….

  1. del

    Looking at the third from bottom photo I had a light bulb moment: That might be a better look… properly finished off, of course! Would agree that contrasting fabric might not have been the bestest choice, but a pocket to hold that phone safely is a grand idea! Also good to know the softer fabric gave more drape. Have looked-but-not-bought this pattern for over a year, so your post is very welcome!

    1. scruffybadgertime Post author

      I do wonder if I could have got away with the welts in the sweatshirt fabric …..but too late now. Certainly not something I shall be unpicking (hence the thought to cover them up with a larger pocket!!)

  2. Tatiana

    I love your welt pockets! What a great idea. I think you should keep them, they add something extra to the basic sweatshirt.

  3. Eliza-sew-little

    I love those welt pockets. I think they look brilliant. Is it that they’re not able to support your phone as you wanted? Looks wise I think they’re brilliant. I’m going to do that to my next sweatshirt. Pockets are go.

  4. Irene

    Love your pockets! There are very similar pockets often on cardigans. Just out of curiosity I googled “welt pockets sweatshirt” (images) – seems that welt pockets on sweatshirts very often are on a slant, not straight as yours are, and that would most likely make them less secure for carrying a phone. Perhaps you’ll start a new “fad”. Sorry – didn’t mean to carry on at such length.

  5. Jo

    I think the welt pockets look great! And I think the contrast ribbing works. But I know exactly what you mean – if you feel too home-ec wearing it then covering them with a kangaroo pocket is a good idea πŸ™‚

  6. Karen

    You can carry off more than most of us. In a good way. You just have so much confidence. Fehrtrade did a kangaroo pocket with a pocket inside on a hoodie. Really safe for cycling. Love the colours K xXx

  7. Joan

    I really do love those pockets with or without contrasting fabric on the welts. I can also see them with zippers to provide the ultimate safe place for a phone, keys, etc.

  8. Elisabeth

    I think I agree with you – just because you can, doesn’t mean you should. I think the jumper/ sweatshirt would look better with a kangaroo pocket.
    Also you’ve got me thinking I mught need that pattern in my life…

  9. Jennifer Hill

    Personally, I think side opening pockets really wouldn’t be as secure. Is the width of the contrast ribbing the issue? I think I’d either make it narrower or replace it with the main colour. I think they look nice and more interesting than a kangaroo jobbie. Maybe another time slightly angled down towards the sides? Or how about a 3 part kangaroo type pocket with the 2 sides for your hands and a discreet top opening phone pocket in the middle? It’s lovely though just as is! Jen

  10. Denise

    I like them both! Always good to have a phone pocket too. I’ve just finished a Merchant & Mills Top 64 in sweatshirting (not blogged yet) – it has some similar but more discreet pockets which you might like.

    1. scruffybadgertime Post author

      OOOH! That Merchant & Mills top is a beauty- LOVE those pockets….they are a bit like the Vogue 1247 skirt pockets….that would be an interesting combo to a sweatshirt- thank you!

  11. PsychicKathleen

    I love the fit of your sweatshirt! I’m just about to make up a few t-shirts for my pilates class πŸ™‚ so I’m keen to see what other people are making for casual, comfortable wear. Thank you for that reference to Plush Addict – I will definitely check out their ribbing because hoodies are on my list too!

  12. PsychicKathleen

    Love your sweatshirts! I do think the welt pockets are worth it because like others I agree they add some interest and are useful if you want to go out without your purse πŸ™‚ – like a leisure walk πŸ™‚ Thank you for posting your process on sewing a welt pocket with knits – that was hugely helpful!

  13. Janet

    I think the welt pockets on the sweatshirt are fine – it’s the contrast color that makes it look more like a kid’s sweatshirt – and you’re a kid at heart, right? A kangaroo pocket over them – in the same fabric as the body – would make them more secure for phones or anything else. It would be a nice save.

  14. Cheryl | TimeToCraft

    First time I’ve left you a comment. I love your posts and photos. They aways make me smile. This one included. I think your pockets are a great idea. At first I couldn’t see the problem. The contrast is fun. Then I thought how it would look on me and I knew the solid thick horizontal line around my middle, echoing the hem, would make me look wider. Maybe if the contrast band sloped or blended. At least you can get away with it and, most important, your phone is safe.

  15. Shelly Lovins

    If you like the long cardigan sweater for your boiled wool, try a design like Icebreaker’s Merino Bliss Wrap. It just requires a little extra fabric for the cross over and there used to be a long belt sewn onto the ends of the front so you could tie them behind you and keep the sweater open in front without a lot of fabric dangling.

    Think about it…

  16. LinB

    I like the welt pockets — elevates the style. Most sweatshirts here have a kangaroo pouch for pockets. More useful when the pocket is divided in two by sewing a vertical line down the middle from top to bottom, but that is a DIY improvement.

    Could you add some other decoration to the welts, to dress them up more? Buttons, whether functional or not, on the welts? A tab that either comes down from the top or goes up from the bottom to close the pocketses? Maybe not, sounds like way too much work now that I have nailed that stray thought down in writing.

    1. scruffybadgertime Post author

      I don’t think I want to draw more attention to them although buttons & tabs will make them more secure …but let’s see what I can do with a pocket on the top of the welt pockets…

  17. Trish

    Love the pocketses! Nothing wrong with them or the jumper. I like it slightly better than the grey version. It’s more fun and fun is good in the depths of winter.

  18. scruffybadgertime Post author

    I have split the audience! I can’t believe that some of yo like the wlts, & others can see what my problem is….I will be covering them up, but a huge thank you for trying to make me feel better about them! I promise to show you what becomes of it…

  19. Jennifer Miller

    Well here I come, late to the party, since you’ve already made your decision. But may I just add my 2 cents. I like the welts. I wonder if the problem is the contrast band at the hem? That wouldn’t work for my mega-hips, so I’m certain it’s just a personal thing. Maybe if the bottom is the same as main fabric? Then there isn’t so much going on. (Not that having it “going on” is a bad thing…..) πŸ˜‰

    1. scruffybadgertime Post author

      Hmm….thank you for that perspective! You know I kind of have made my decision, but haven’t implemented it yet, so you are swaying me to reconsider – I wonder if I have enough to replace the hem band with the main fabric …decisions decisions and thank you!!! It’s interesting to think through πŸ™‚

  20. Pingback: Oh go on then! I'll have a floral Linden this time.... - Scruffy Badger Time

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