Miette skirt of fabulousness

So happy new year one & all! No I have not fallen off the face of the earth at all, but was in danger of doing so -I was in desperate need of a break from all things over Christmas which means I have absolutely loads to catch up on now that I have had loads of good family fun, friend fixes & sleeeeep! I feel rested & fresh for the joys of 2015.

I do plan to write my mini review of achievements and goals for 2015, but do not have all the facts to hand & as I am dying to get blogging again, and have been very tardy blogging a lot of my 2014 makes, I will dally no longer and show you something groovy.

miette skirt

I’d been inspired by this version of Tilly’s Miette skirt, and so when venturing out into Goldhawk Road recently with the ever  wonderful Jane, had some checked/ tartan fabric on my shopping list.

miette skirt

By the time I had satisfied many of the other things on my shopping list (I had put lots of planning into this pilgrimage to Goldhawk Road, as you do) I was extremely pleased to discover a fetching collection of plaids in one of the last shops we visited.  Don’t ask me which shop I purchased this from, but I also purchased some navy viscose with amazing drape to make a 1940s tea dress  ( a snip at £2 per metre).  Anyway, this fabric is some kind of nice polyester mix suiting and I was instantly drawn to the colours: magenta and bottle green. The decision was easy, and I think this fabric was about £7 per metre. I bought two metres, planning to make a Miette skirt with a wrap but not ties. The ties can take up quite a lot of fabric, and in the winter, I felt that this skirt will be layered upon & so ties and bows would become squashed/ lumpy/ compromised (despite my original inspiration rocking ties big time).

miette skirt

It was important think about pattern and matching when I was cutting it out, so I cut each piece individually, laying out cut pieces against its pair to work out how the pattern would align. the Miette skirt has some cool chevron opportunities with diagonal centre front seaming. This check is a rectangular check, like many , and as a result you are never going to get each row forming perfect chevrons, but I did manage to conjure it up so that the green ones match.

Miette skirt

I wanted to experiment with the direction of the pattern on the pockets so also played around on position of grainlines as they would look on the cut out skirt pieces before deciding on how to cut them out. The pockets I also cut out individually to make sure they matched as a pair. The top of the pockets therefore are almost cut on the bias, and I considered adding a line of interfacing to stabilise the seamline here, but didn’t actually in the end, and it is OK as it the fabric is reasonably robust and not that drapey.

miette skirt

Out of sheer laziness I made the waistband half the width it comes up in the pattern. This was because I wanted to use that wonderful waistband vilene and it just happened to be this width.  All the foldlines and seamlines are incorporated into the vilene & it was just easier to go with that as it gives such a nice finish.  Due to the mechanics of making the wrap & tie waistband, the pattern is drafted with a six piece waistband – three pieces for the waistband front with three pieces for the waistband facing.  This is what the skirt looks like if you make the waistband by using only three pieces folded in half & omitting the facings.  (Apols if I have just lost you there in some waistband piecing vortex!  But you never know, someone might appreciate it!!)

miette skirtMaking the Miette skirt up is a quick sew. Very satisfying. It was a Boxing Day make.

miette skirt

I think making it without the ties saves a lot of time too, as I can remember they are very long pieces to turn the right way around.  I discovered these gorgeous vintage buttons in my button stash & made two buttonholes – both on the outside as i want to show them both off as a feature.

miette skirt

I’ve been wearing it a lot since. It’s a perfect winter skirt with tights and boots.  The first time I made it, I described it as “cute meeting utility” & have to say that I am almost taking the pockets for granted this time.  What this skirt does for me this time is to make me feel girly yet warm, which is often a challenge in the winter when you feel the cold like I do – trousers are often my first resort as I think they will be warmer.  It is so lovely to have a cosy swishy skirt to wear.

miette skirt

All I need to take me into deeper winter are some thermal tights ….M&S will be getting a visit 🙂

Glad to be back blogging again – I will probably be appearing a bit more frequently as I catch up on some of the things I have been doing over December (& possibly even November! yikes)

Happy New Year everyone – hope it’s filled with sewing, fun & friendship x

26 thoughts on “Miette skirt of fabulousness

    1. scruffybadgertime Post author

      Hi Natalie
      Thank you! The fabric is such a hit for me – I adore the colours and how they make me feel when wearing them! The alternative button/fastening is also an even lazier way to make it 😉 !! That’s always a winner for me !!

      Reply
  1. Eliza-sew-little

    A girly twirly skirt. It’s fab. I love the chevron effect on the pockets. Another one to add to my inspiration board. Taa. And I’m glad you’re back 🙂

    Reply
  2. Debbie

    I like the chevron plaid effect, it takes the skirt out of the ordinary. Looks like a great warm winter wear . Happy New year to you 🙂 I am looking forward to seeing your 2015 sewing adventures. Xxx

    Reply
  3. Jane

    Ooh it’s lovely Winnie, perfectly chic for winter and the colours really suit you. Thanks also for reminding me what we bought that poly viscose for (1940’s tea dress of. course!) I’ve been racking my brains ever since I got it home! Happy New Year! x

    Reply
    1. scruffybadgertime Post author

      Oh Jane, your polyviscose is such a fab colour….can’t wait to see you transform it into the tea dress…..and thank you for your astute advice when purchasing this fabric! Your second opinion & yardage thoughts made this an even swifter decision!!

      Reply
  4. Sue

    What a fabulous skirt for winter – makes me wish for chilly weather and log fires! You did a fabulous job with the plaid matching, I love the chevron effect.

    Reply
    1. scruffybadgertime Post author

      Thank you Jenna!! I like the idea of a tartan circle skirt too ….and if it is in one piece, just one seam. Hmm. tempting!! But I don’t think I have any fabric in my stash to progress that dream just yet, but thank you for the inspiration!

      Reply
  5. Kim Hood

    Great matching on the chevrons! I applaud you for reminding me of the skirts and thick tights option – I always head for trousers too but tights winterproof skirts.

    Reply
    1. scruffybadgertime Post author

      Absolutely! I need to invest in some thermal tights for sure, then that will open up new opportunities even when it is cold….sounds granny-like, thermal tights, but I feel sure they are the holy grail for dressing well in the winter!!

      Reply
  6. Philippa

    Yes I like this! I have the (PDF) Miette pattern to make, it’s been in my to make pile since LAST spring but I really will get it made up this year. You did a great job with the plaids and wear it well. Happy new year!

    Reply
    1. scruffybadgertime Post author

      Thank you Lynne, and I am loving it, but still wish I could have got even better chevrons! I look at it when I am wearing it and wonder whether I have matched it as well as I could have! But it doesnt spoil it for me 🙂

      Reply
  7. Heather B

    Wow, I love this! It fits the winter skirt criteria perfectly. Great idea to mix up the direction of the pocket print as well. It looks super fun to wear.

    Reply
    1. scruffybadgertime Post author

      Heather, you are the queen of super fun wearable makes! And yes, I am having heaps of fun times with its swishy girliness. I think the pockets worked out OK in the end going at a different angle, seemed an opportunity not to be missed.

      Reply

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