Vogue 1247 testing testing, in fact more testing than I predicted

Oh wow, what a few days it’s been.  I have been beside myself with excitement appearing on the Colette Patterns blog as a featured seamstress yesterday with my pink elephant Violet.  Thank you to everyone who left lovely comments & came to visit, and thank you to Colette Patterns for inviting me.  I blush!  Anyway best get on with some real life …..

Having spied Karen’s very wearable top, referred to her as a “French Seam Dream”  (what would you call it, a “blouson” perhaps?) it came to me that it would make a perfect home sewn gift for  friends that wouldn’t require fitting.  It is meant to be loose afterall, as long as I know the approximate sizing I should get away with it.  I am already imagining my friends’ delight as they open something from me that is not a bag or a scarf or jewellery (as has been the history of pressies over the last few years!).  Now I am not versatile enough to always make them something different – I tend to veer towards variations on a theme, and this year’s birthdays they will all get a version of this “blouson” I have decreed.

What really sold it for me was the skirt that is also included in the pattern – it has hip height horizontal hidden pockets.  Yeah baby!  I shall be making one of these even if the top looks awful on my body shape.  Styles that hide my waist tend not to work that well on me, but I still persist, misled into thinking that I can rock the whole “White Stuff” casual yummy look.  I thought it was worth a punt, especially as it appeared to have intriguing construction – the front under bust area is almost patchwork, but using French seams (erk!).  I decided to trial it for myself, extremely impatient for what I thought would be a quick & satisfying make (Looking back, I should have gone with a Renfrew).   This trial of course was in the interest of science and contributed to “unselfish sewing” as the objective is presents for friends.

This top, shall we aka “blouson”, has no neck facings & as mentioned is constructed largely with French seams and faced with self bias binding.

My particular challenges with this style (how did you manage it Karen, you genius?) was getting the “points” of the four triangle-patchwork meeting together at the underbust centre front via French seams.   Not perfect, but I learnt for next time.  I am considering using my overlocker actually & not going French.  Je m’excuse, mais “je suis allergique au travail” (as a Snoopy sweatshirt said that I bought on a French exchange aged 13).  What else was I challenged by?  It feels embarrassing to have to admit that I also mishandled/ mis-cut the sleeve facing/cuffs since they really did not seem to fit.  I took an executive & very impatient decision to dispense with them, realising too late that it has been designed with turn back cuffs.  Oh well, I will perfect it next time.  I just wanted this blouson finished….& it had not been as easy as I thought it would be.  Once the centre front patchwork was not accurate enough I almost wrote off any further aspirations of perfection, regarding this as a very “workable” & hopefully “wearable” muslin.  Another aspect that I found not entirely satisfactory – yes- there is more- you wouldn’t think such a “blouson” would cause me so many issues- was the v neck.  I found it gaped.  Possibly I needed to make a smaller size for me.

Anyway, here it is.  I feel if I made it for me again I would shape the side seam waist a tad.  (But hang on, wasn’t the point of this make that I was practising for my friends?!) The other picture below shows me taking in some of the excess.  I am not sure.  On the Vogue patterns website it states that this style is suitable for multiple body shapes, mine included.

 

What do you think?  Next time (for me) should I keep it a billowing & shapeless blouson or add a small amount of shaping? Because you see I like it.  I like that I have something fun & colourful to wear with jeans.  I do sometimes aspire to that whole “White Stuff” look.  It is casual, it is comfy, it is bright, it is feminine.  It is in the same category of my clothes that I like, but “shouldn’t really wear” if I want to emphasize my natural assets.  Like the shorts I am wearing it with in these pics.  But I LOVE them.  I don’t think they are as unflattering on me as a black long line needlecord skirt that I once had.  It was straight, western style pockets & seams with a deep frill around its hem.  I thought it was great – warm in winter, looked good with boots & jumpers, handy colour, & the frill was sweet.  Until I saw a photo of me wearing it.  I looked like a dumpy tube the width of my not slimline hips.  That was the end of that style faux pas.

Do you find that you have some clothes that break your personal “shape/ style” rules?  At what point do you recognise that the erstwhile favourite skirt  needs to be given to charity?  How much leeway do you give yourself?  Do you also ignore your better half when they say “those shorts aren’t very flattering on you”?

PS Any of you that use Picasa, what do you think of all the extra bejangles?  I am thrilled as I think it almost covers my needs, including turning back the clock on that first photo to make it more at home with my childhood photographs.  The only thing I need to explore is how to reduce the size of a picture (not cropping, but mega pixels).  I am not sure if this is part of Picasa’s offering.  I forgot to look this time!

40 thoughts on “Vogue 1247 testing testing, in fact more testing than I predicted

  1. LinB

    Oh, I like the top all blousy and loose. The summer breeze will shape and mold it to your body as you stroll along the beach or through fields of lavender blossoms. Am on the fence about buying this pattern for myself, as I have so many already of similar shape. The matching-points-at-french seams bit is also daunting, altho I’ve pieced lots and lots of quilt tops for my hand-quilting friends to poke needles at. Carolyn at Diary of a Sewing Fanatic is all over this skirt, and has adapted the pocket treatment for many of her dresses recently.

    Reply
  2. edenz

    I find that the “looks good on these bodytypes” on the pattern packaging are just to try to sell it to as many people as possible. What they really mean is “looks good on MODELS with these bodytypes” which is not very translatable for those of us who aren’t shaped like models.

    Reply
  3. Roobeedoo

    I absolutely know where you are coming from with this. It is the same “feeling” that Japanese patterns have – that sort of sophisticated casual air. I love this top, but was put off by all those seams. You are very brave to think of making it your “go to” present for friends! I prefer how it looks “loose” on you. With those shorts, it is “evening out while on cycling holiday in the South of France”… and the material is lovely!

    Reply
    1. scruffybadgertime Post author

      Thanks roo, yes, It’s almost a lifestyle look isn’t it? And I’m so there – cycling in France under blossom laden trees with sunlight peeping through the gaps…..what snow in Scotland?!

      Reply
  4. Tiffany

    I think the photo with the shaped top looks great! It’s very effortlessly-chic in that beachy casual kind of way. And the shorts are cute. Don’t listen to that silly man!

    Reply
      1. Tiffany

        Hello to you, too! I’ve been reading for awhile and thought it was time to say hi. :)

        I’m usually catching up on blogs on my phone, so I don’t comment much since it’s so fiddly with that little tiny keyboard. First-world problems, I know! Anyway, you’re a brilliant seamstress and I love your style. Especially those wigs. Awesome!

        Reply
  5. Magpie Mimi

    Sounds a lot like the Colette Taffy construction with all those French seams. I like it on you as it’s not too shapeless, but know what you mean about the wanting the ‘White Stuff’ look and it probably not being the best shape. Le Sigh.

    Reply
  6. charlotte

    What a nice pattern, I may have a look myself. Indeed I think both versions look good. I’m rather bond of the oversized slouchy look, hides many extra curves, not that you have these.

    Reply
  7. Tamsin W-P

    I think it looks lovely as it is, very pretty material and the shape looks fine to me. I have lots of things that I wear because I like them, but am not entirely convinced that they are flattering!

    Reply
  8. Ginger

    Ooh, I think this looks cute as can be! Nice and relaxed for summer!

    I never listen to the mister re: clothes/fashion. He will occasionally pick something out for me that’s “cool” (usually bright orange or bedazzled or, um, snug), and he hates anything that looks vintage. :)

    Oh, and I was SO EXCITED to see you as the featured gal on Coletterie!! Hooray!!

    Reply
    1. scruffybadgertime Post author

      Thanks ginger, I saw your comment over there too, so kind.
      Interesting that you don’t get support for vintage, It’s hard to believe that there are people that dislike it when online there’s so much vintage love!!

      Reply
  9. Sigrid

    It’s a lovely blouse and I am quite impressed by the thought alone of making that front bit with french seams. I am used to seeing the supermodel Scruffy Badger in clothes a bit more fitted and designed to accentuate her fabulous curves, but I think this look could work with a skinnier pants leg– or like this bicycling through the south of France, as Roobeedoo suggests.

    And you ask if I am ever tempted into alternate fashion identities? Yes, aren’t we all? I tend to feel terrible in anything very loose. My frame is pretty small and I end up feeling like a frail waif in overlarge clothing.

    Reply
    1. scruffybadgertime Post author

      You crack me up sigrid! You sound like you have super model potential with that whole waif look,but well done for keeping your distance from sucked in cheekbones and sporting ‘le sac’ dresses….tempting though it may be

      Reply
  10. debbie

    I am impressed by your perserverance in completing those seams! The top is pretty. I know what you mean about the whole White Stuff look, it is pretty but kind of wearable too. I have very very similar shorts. Think mine are Fat Face but in the loft at the moment! I am never sure if mine look good or over sized boy scout, but they are great for mucking about in with kids. I do quite hanker for some chic-er shorts though. :)

    Reply
    1. scruffybadgertime Post author

      Debbie, you are right, they are indeed Fat Face shorts….or 3/4 trousers. I think what I like about them is that they reflect the part of me that is a tomboy – whilst remaining girly. So yes, mucking in with kids, small & grown up alike, these shorts facilitate that!

      Reply
  11. Tanit-Isis

    I think it’s gorgeous. If it were me (like you) I’d be tempted to add the side-seam shaping, but I tend to have mental blocks against loose-fitting clothes, myself.

    I think switching to a simple serged seam for the gift versions is entirely justifiable.

    Was the gaping neckline a pattern issue or a stretching-out-bias-fabric issue? I must admit, V-necklines in wovens kind of terrify me for the stretching-issue alone. Maybe I need to start gathering my stay-stitching a bit or something…

    Reply
    1. scruffybadgertime Post author

      That’s great support Tanit-Isis, re the serging ! I shall try that next. As for the gaping neckline, I am not 100% sure. All I know is that I fudged the end result to make it sit better. You have got me thinking now as I do need to make sure I get it right next time!

      Reply
  12. Annemarie

    Winnie, this looks lovely on you. I made it and it was a wadder. It just looked like giant surgical scrubs on me. I was so disappointed too because it was one of the top 10 on Diane’s patternreview.com list.

    Reply
    1. scruffybadgertime Post author

      Annemarie, that’s a shame, but thanks for the warning ….I can see how this is a pitfall of a style like this. Note to myself, must not make up in minty green fabric!

      Reply
      1. LinB

        Unless Gary does a horror flick. The reason hospital scrubs and operating rooms use that particular shade of green is because blood shows up so well against it, making it easier for cleaning crew to wipe up every speck of blood as they clean and disinfect before the next patient. One assumes they clean and disinfect before the next patient … well, that’s a dark place I never thought my mind would wander today!

        Reply
  13. didyoumakethat

    I’m wearing my V1247 as I type! How do I get everything to meet and line up? I don’t. Prints hide many sins, remember that. I think yours looks lovely on you. I have definitely found that this top is unwearable without a vest beneath it. As you say, it gapes far too much when bending down for something!

    Reply
    1. scruffybadgertime Post author

      Ah ha! You mean your seams are hidden like mine in the business of the pattern. Somehow I think yours are better than mine….and yes, it is low cut, too low cut for wearing on its own…..glad It’s not just me :-)

      Reply
  14. Rachel

    I think you are totally pulling off the White stuff yummy casual look – maybe it feels odd to everyone wearing this style of outfit, but looks good? I’ve made the skirt twice and I love it. I’ve lengthened it both times though – by quite a lot one time to get a knee length skirt. As drafted, it’s about the same length as those dresses that are only decent on toddlers, with bloomers underneath…. and even then it’s probably borderline ;-)
    But the drafting of the skirt was spot on – for me at least – and it can be made up really quickly (if the bias seam binding is omitted)… have fun!

    Reply
    1. scruffybadgertime Post author

      Hi Rachel, that’s really interesting and useful to know about the skirt…it does look pretty “mini”, doesn’t it!! I shall beware of that. Looks like a great casual style…

      Reply
  15. Lavender

    What a fantastic idea, this loose-fitting top as a gift! I’d love to sew garments for friends and fam (and they’ve asked), but fitting is a nightmare. I think you look fab! Maybe shape the sides a bit, but either way it looks great. I have the same trouble… I so want to be lanky and wear this casual, flowing resort wear. But let’s face it, that’s not the figure I’ve got. Sometimes I still try, though! I’m all over the place. And sometimes I listen to my hubs, sometimes I ignore him and cut/sew away :)

    Reply
  16. Rachel

    I love this top and I love your version of it! The fabric is perfect for it, and it looks great on. I’ve made 4 versions of the top and a couple of the skirt with varying degrees of success (some french seams came together better than others and the sleeve facing never fitted for mine!) I used it for OWOP (set at http://www.flickr.com/photos/racall/sets/72157629346921022/with/7017724271/). I had to lengthen the bodice and shape the sides or it was very unflattering – I still think it looks better on those less well endowed than me but I love it anyway. The skirt is great too but very, very short… I thought both times I’d added enough length but they are the shortest skirts I own.

    Reply
  17. MrsC

    Dear Scruff, I have some thoughts. Since this is a serious issue. 1) if you make this style in such a busy print, why not disperse with those diagonal seams, as noone will see them? This will simplify construction a lot. 2) gaping on one side of a V neck is easy to sort – sew both sides from the tip ov the V to the shoulder, rather than from one side, down and up again. This is because sewing stretches the bias grain on the ‘down stroke’, so don’t do one, do two ups. 3) I like that fabric, very pretty and I am less interested in things being flattering than suiting my personality. I see the ‘suiting’ bit as a bonus :)

    Reply
    1. scruffybadgertime Post author

      MrsC, this is useful advice – thank you – I should try that tip out for the bias neckline as it sounds just the job. And also, yes, those diagonal seams do not show do they …
      And too right- I agree that a wardrobe that suits your personality is where comfort comes from ….

      Reply
  18. Jessica

    Oooooh, this looks like a glorious top. I think it looks good the way it is – the light weight of the fabric makes its blousiness much more forgiving :-). And I think the denim 3/4 pants look great on you … or maybe I am just deluding myself too, since I’ll wear clothing like that and tell myself that it looks fine. In the beginning, as I was rediscovering my personal style or feeling a bit insecure about it, I would stick close to clothing that I was “supposed” to wear to flatter my body, but then as I got comfortable I would break those rules more and more. And since most of it is in your attitude anyways ;-), as long as you’re feeling good in it, that’ll get you almost all of the way there.

    Reply
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